Economics

Economics
Max and Stacy give you all the financial news you need as the Global Insurrection Against Banker Occupation gathers pace. Occupy Wall Street, Crash JP Morgan, Buy Silver and DEFINITELY visit MaxKeiser.com!
Updated: 4 hours 37 min ago

Does BBC Screen Guests and Coach Them on What To Say?

4-Jun-2017

BBC telling invited guests, off camera, "not to go too heavy on the Tories".

Clip courtesy of @AshBeechey pic.twitter.com/7UAzVHFJ0t

— Will Black (@WillBlackWriter) June 2, 2017

Yes. I can confirm that BBC instructs guests what they can and cannot say. The way this is managed is via several pre-interviews with different producers who listen to your answers to possible questions asked on air – and then repeat your answer in the words they want you to use – saying “wouldn’t it be more impartial to say…” with implication being, here’s what we want you to say – but in your own words. If it appears you aren’t playing along they cancel the booking. If you parrot what they want you might get asked back. When we presented our own show “The Oracle with Max Keiser” on BBC World – the BBC engaged in outright censorship and propaganda. We told them to sod off and cut ties with them.

[KR1079] Keiser Report: Dotcom Bubble 2.0?

3-Jun-2017

We discuss whether or not stock prices will zigzag lower for decades to come; or whether they will go out with a bang. In the second half Max talks to Karl Denninger of Market-Ticker.org about tech stocks and why they are rising so rapidly – are we in Dotcom Bubble 2.0?

Hahaha Bitcoin Price Now Double Gold Price

3-Jun-2017

The market cap of Gold is hugely, bigly, more but psychologically a nominal price move twice that of Gold gets press and press brings in more adopters and the virtuous cycle bolts higher.  Success begets success.

Projecting the Price of Bitcoin

2-Jun-2017

I’ve taken the liberty of preparing a projection of bitcoin’s price action going forward:

You see the primary dynamic is continued skepticism from the mainstream, which owns essentially no cryptocurrency and conventionally views bitcoin and its peers as fads, scams and bubbles that will soon pop as price crashes back to near-zero.

Skepticism is always a wise default position to start one’s inquiry, but if no knowledge is being acquired, skepticism quickly morphs into stubborn ignorance.

Bitcoin et al. are not the equivalent of Beanie Babies. Cryptocurrencies have utility value. They facilitate international payments for goods and services.

The primary cryptocurrencies are not a scam. Advertising a flawless Beanie Baby and shipping a defective Beanie Baby is a scam. Advertising a mortgage-backed security as low-risk and delivering a guaranteed-to-default stew of toxic mortgages is a scam.

The primary cryptocurrencies (bitcoin, Ethereum and Dash) have transparent rules for emitting currency. The core characteristic of a scam is the asymmetry between what the seller knows (the product is garbage) and what the buyer knows (garsh, this mortgage-backed security is low-risk–look at the rating).

Both buyers and sellers of primary cryptocurrencies are in a WYSIWYG market: what you see is what you get. While a Beanie Baby scam might use cryptocurrencies as a means of exchange, this doesn’t make primary cryptocurrencies a scam, any more than using dollars to transact a scam makes the dollar itself a scam.

Bubbles occur when everyone and their sister is trading/buying into a “hot” market. Bubbles pop when the pool of greater fools willing and able to pay nose-bleed valuations runs dry. In other words, when everyone with the desire and means to buy in and has already bought in, there’s nobody left to buy in at a higher price (except for central banks, of course).

At that point, normal selling quickly pushes prices off the cliff as there is no longer a bid from buyers, only frantic sellers trying to cash in their winnings at the gambling hall.

While a few of my global correspondents own/use the primary cryptocurrencies, and a few speculate in the pool of hundreds of lesser cryptocurrencies, I know of only one friend/ relative /colleague / neighbor who owns cryptocurrency.

When only one of your circle of acquaintances, colleagues, friends, neighbors and extended family own an asset, there is no way that asset can be in a bubble, as the pool of potential buyers is thousands of times larger than the pool of present owners.

I discussed The Network Effect last year: The Network Effect, Jobs and Entrepreneurial Vitality (April 7, 2016):

The Network Effect is expressed mathematically in Metcalfe’s Law: the value of a communications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected devices/users of the system.

The Network Effect cannot be fully captured by Metcalfe’s Law, as the value of the network rises with the number of users in communication with others and with the synergies created by networks of users within the larger network, for example, ecosystems of suppliers and customers.

In other words, the Network Effect is not simply the value created by connected users; more importantly, it is the value created by the information and knowledge shared by users in sub-networks and in the entire network.

This is The Smith Corollary to Metcalfe’s Law: the value of the network is created not just by the number of connected devices/users but by the value of the information and knowledge shared by users in sub-networks and in the entire network.

In the context of the primary cryptocurrencies, the network effect (and The Smith Corollary to Metcalfe’s Law) is one core driver of valuation: the more individuals and organizations that start using cryptocurrencies, the higher the utility value and financial value of those networks (cryptocurrencies).

In other words, cryptocurrencies are not just stores of value and means of exchange–they are networks.

The true potential value of cryptocurrencies will not become visible until the global economy experiences a catastrophic collapse of debt and/or a major fiat currency. These events are already baked into the future, in my view; nothing can possibly alter the eventual collapse of the current debt/credit bubble and the fiat currencies that are being issued to inflate those bubbles.

The skeptics will continue declaring bitcoin a bubble that’s bound to pop at $3,000, $5,000, $10,000 and beyond. When the skeptics fall silent, the potential for a bubble will be in place.

When all the former skeptics start buying in at any price, just to preserve what’s left of their fast-melting purchasing power in other currencies, then we might see the beginning stages of a real bubble.

The wild card in cryptocurrencies is the role of Big Institutional Money. When hedge funds, insurance companies, corporations, investment banks, sovereign wealth funds etc. start adding bitcoin et al. as core institutional holdings, the price may well surprise all but the most giddy prognosticators.

The Network Effect can become geometric/exponential very quickly. It’s something to ponder while researching the subject with a healthy skepticism.

If you found value in this content, please join me in seeking solutions by becoming a $1/month patron of my work via patreon.com.

Why trusting in the bigger picture gives you trust in gold

2-Jun-2017
  • Trump pulls out of Paris Climate Accord
  • Gold pauses ahead of non-farm payrolls data
  • In Gold We Trust 2017 released
  • Reports on the ‘Everything Bubble’
  • On average gold is up 5.88% ytd, since start of 2017.
  • Trump ‘was the trigger of the sudden reverse thrust of the gold price’
  • Reorganization of the global monetary order considered a ‘grey swan’

Trump’s announcement late yesterday that the US would be pulling out of the landmark 2015 Paris climate accord saw gold prices retreat. Markets are now awaiting the release of the non-farm payroll data. General consensus is that 210,000 new positions were added in May. However, this could be an underestimation given the stronger ADP number yesterday.

The Paris climate deal, jobs numbers, elections and terrorist attacks are all important ingredients in the tale of an economy. But they should not be considered individually when considering the gold price or gold investment. They all come together to form a far more complex story, which is the global financial and geopolitical system.

Yesterday Incrementum’s widely respected In Gold We Trust report was released. The authors do a stellar job of considering not only the wider picture but also what we can learn from history. This is refreshing in an age when many mainstream, day-to-day analyses look for individual bullish and bearish signs for gold, when in reality all the signs need to be considered together.

The report covers a multitude of angles and considers even more economic, financial and political factors. As we often conclude, investors should not focus on small events but rather look at what they all point to and why they are happening. This is in contrast to the mainstream media who often can’t be considered to do this. Perhaps we should not be surprised by this, an academic study released last month found journalists have ‘a lower than average ability to regulate emotions, suppress biases, solve complex problems, switch between tasks, and think flexibly and creatively.’ Oh dear!

Perhaps we can now understand a little better why we fail to spot much coverage in the mainstream of the underlying dangers in the financial system and how investors and savers can protect themselves. With this in mind we suggest you enjoy the highlights of the In Gold We Trust Report, below and continue to take the mainstream financial media with a pinch of salt.

Frustrated with gold? Blame Trump

The gold price was having a great time in the first half of last year. Long-term we believe we know where it is headed and it looked like, in 2016, that it was well on its way. Then something happened and it changed its mind. Why? Incrementum’s authors Ronald-Peter Stoeferle and Mark Valek argue that ‘ironically’ Trump ‘was the trigger of the sudden reverse thrust of the gold price.’

Read full story here…

 

Access Award Winning Daily and Weekly Updates Here

[KR1078] Keiser Report: Germany vs USA in era of deglobalization

2-Jun-2017

We discuss an era in which Germany once again is at the center of a major shift in global power in which a period of deglobalization accompanies one empire collapsing and another rising. We also discuss America’s ‘soft’ development versus China’s ‘hard’ development and whether or not this might deliver more peace than the world has seen in the past decades.

Gold to benefit from Uncertainty thanks to Twitter and UK elections

1-Jun-2017
  • Gold hits five-week high
  • Reaches $1,273.74/oz, highest since April 25th
  • Sterling recovers after UK polls point towards a hung Parliament
  • Expected Fed-tightening capped gains
  • 90-dead in Kabul, further signs of increasing tension in Middle East
  • Trump expected to pull out of Paris Accord and Trump’s anti-Iran axis already feuding

Yesterday gold hit $1,273.74/oz, a level not seen for five weeks. Analysts point to some safe-haven demand for the yellow metal on account of the geopolitical tensions, upcoming UK elections and tomorrow’s non-farm payroll data.

We suggest investors look beyond data releases and political peacocking, and instead look at what the greater picture shows which is uncertainty on all fronts.

All about the Federal Reserve

Amongst mainstream financial analysts, all eyes appear to be on the expected Federal Reserve rate hikes. Thomson Reuters data shows traders see an 87% chance of a 25-basis-point hike at the next Federal Reserve meeting, this month.

Softer economic data of late, may mean that the Janet Yellen and her team might not be so keen to ramp up rates this month. Investigations into Russia’s alleged involvement in the 2016 U.S. election and possible collusion with Trump’s campaign also have clouded the prospect of a rate hike next month. The plan was for two further rate hikes this year in order to tighten the central bank’s balance sheet.

Fed policy tightening is expected to be negative for gold. But times might be changing as we note that in both December and March, following rate rises, gold decided to rally. This might be on account of expectations of over-tightening by the Fed and which would tip the country into a recession. Good news for gold.

Should the Fed over tighten, then they are likely to return forward guidance. As we know this is a great environment for the gold price due to increased inflation and a weaker currency.

Jitters over UK elections

In what feels like groundhog day for many UK-voters, there will be an election next week. To listen to the international media one could be forgiven the election is about Brexit. It is a general election which has consequences far beyond Brexit negotiations. Many of these consequences are unknown, which suggests a positive environment for gold regardless of the outcome.

When the election was initially called it seemed as though Mrs May’s election was a dead cert, however the polls suggest it might not be so easy. This morning news of a YouGov poll commissioned by the Times show Mrs May has a battle ahead of her. YouGov found the Conservative lead has slipped dramatically in recent weeks and is now within the margin of error. In April, when the election was first called, the Tories had a 24-point lead over Labour.

Read full story here…

Access Award Winning Daily and Weekly Updates Here

Jim Rickards on the Golden Conspiracy

31-May-2017
  • Hedge fund, PhD statistician claims gold market is “the most blatant case of manipulation”
  • PhD: “Statistically impossible unless there’s manipulation occurring”
  • Gold serves as political chips on the world’s financial stage.
  • Price is being suppressed until China gets the gold that they need
  • Gold will go higher when all central banks ‘confront the next global liquidity crisis’
  • ‘When that happens, physical gold may not be available at all.’

Jim Rickards: The Golden Conspiracy

Is there gold price manipulation going on? Absolutely. There’s no question about it. That’s not just an opinion.

There is statistical evidence piling up to make the case, in addition to anecdotal evidence and forensic evidence. The evidence is very clear, in fact.

These are the opening lines of Jim Rickards’ piece ‘The Golden Conspiracy’, an op-ed that may surprise even the most seasoned followers of gold markets.

Gold and silver price manipulation is not a new topic to regular readers. For years the idea that precious metals markets are subject to more than just free market forces has been dismissed by the mainstream. Many have referred to gold and silver manipulation as topic fodder for the conspiracy and deep web forums. This is despite evidence to the contrary.

In the last eighteen months or so what was dismissed as anecdotal tales of manipulation has finally been recognised by the regulators and lawmakers as something very real and serious. Fines have been doled out and regulators have been slowly implementing new rules.

But what if the manipulation goes above institutions that can be called to account? Can they be fined? Can it be somewhat controlled by the authorities? What if it is a country doing the manipulation? Rickards believes it is.

‘…where is the manipulation coming from? There are a number of suspects but you need look no further than China.’

Role of China

Previously we have been excited about China’s role in the gold market. In April last year they launched yuan denominated gold bullion trading. We not only expected this to further boost its power in the global gold and forex markets but to also lead to increased transparency and reduce price manipulation.

However the country is not only keen to increase transparency in the market for their own long-term gain, they have short-term goals as well – to increase their gold reserves.

Read full story here…

Access Award Winning Daily and Weekly Updates Here

Pages